How Personal Trainers Can Leverage Groupon

This week we are going to try something a little different. Let’s explore daily deal websites in an effort to increase your referrals. Other trainers have done this and found a great deal of success.

If you aren’t familiar with daily deal sites like Groupon and Living Social they offer goods and services at discounted prices. For consumers, they are great because they can try new places and do new things at discounted prices. These discounts put businesses in front of thousands of local people, and present consumers with a competitive deal with a sense of urgency.

These sites have a large following. Which means you can sell a group fitness class to a greater audience than you could reach on your own. You could offfer the class at a price that will be attractive for bargain hunters, yet still make sure it is financially worth it for you.

In other words, if you charge $100 for a one-on-one training session, offer a “deal” of $100 for a group-training session for 10 people. With these 10 people, you will still average the same hourly rate, and have a pool of potential clients to cultivate.

Worst Case Scenario

Only 10 people, one class, buy your deal (very unlikely), and none of these people return after the class is over. Still you’ve made a quick grand and maybe those people will refer you to their friends.

Best Case Scenario

You’re deal becomes very popular; you are able to hold multiple classes, and convert the majority of the bargain hunters into regular clients.

The difference between the two scenarios is a trainer who plans on conversion. Go into this with a well thought out step-by-step strategy for converting bargain hunters into long-term paying clients. At each step of the process, from the point of sale to the very last session, have a plan for conversion. Here are some strategies other trainers have used that worked for them…

  • Require a small deposit to hold a spot in the class of their choice. This will separate the quality bargain hunters from the rest. If someone isn’t willing to put down a $1-$5 refundable deposit (credit card only) they probably aren’t going to be willing to invest in your services.
  • At the beginning of the class explain that this is a course designed to prepare them for your usual services. Throughout the course remind them that they are working toward building the strength and stamina it takes to train with you. Then, without bragging, tell them the results they would have a chance to experience if they worked with you. If you can, bring in one of your best clients to “help” teach a session, and be an ambassador for your services.
  • Sit down individually with each person. At this time ask for feedback, share quality advice, and try to lay out a plan that would work for them once they have completed the course. At this time present them with another offer that stresses an immediate commitment.

Conversion is all about having the right state of mind. Go into it with the mindset that these people need and want your services but they just don’t know it yet. If you truly believe in what you do, and how you do it, other people will see that passion and follow you.

About

Angie Pattengale is co-owner and chief executive officer of the National Federation of Professional Trainers, where she works behind the scenes on relationship-building, advertising, policies and procedures, test development and delivery, and growing the business. She joined her father, NFPT founder Ron Clark, at the company in 1994.