Three Ways to Do Lunges Using Suspension Straps

By |October 30th, 2017|Exercise Programming|

lunges

Suspension straps are a great way to modify lunges to make them easier or more difficult. A win-win for fitness programming! 

I started using these more in my sessions after speaking with 50 personal trainers and fitness instructors about their go-to lunge modifications.

Here are three great options for lunging with suspension straps with links to blogs that include videos for each.

Modification Progression to Lunges

Once your client no longer needs lunge modifications, it’s time to progress their development to build their muscular endurance and improve their balance.

The following 3 lunge options use stability straps to progress clients from modifications to advanced lungers.

Option 1: Beginner Suspension Strap Lunges

  • Face the anchor point and center the front leg.
  • Hold the straps so they are taut and stack the elbows under the shoulders.
  • Bend the back leg lowering the hips to a 90 degree bend.
  • To return to starting position, drive through the heel while extending the hips.
  • Keep the spine straight, and the chest lifted.

 

Option 2: Intermediate Suspension Strap Lunges

  • Center the front leg as you face the anchor point.
  • Stack the elbows under the shoulders without any slack in the straps.
  • Lift the back leg-suspending it in front of you at a 90 degree angle while still balancing on the front leg.
  • Then, lower the front leg, and send the suspended leg back.
  • Touch the ball of the foot down for more stability. Float the back foot without touching to advance the movement.
  • Weight in the heel, spine straight, and chest lifted to come back up.

 

Option 3: Advanced Suspension Strap Lunges

  • Facing away from the anchor point, place 1 foot in the cradle (handle straps) directly below.
  • Align the shoulders over the hips.
  • Send the suspended knee back while lowering the hips and front knee to 90 degrees.
  • Return to standing position by driving through the front foot and keeping the spine straight. 

 

About the Author:

Theresa Perales has an MA in Spanish, and is an ESL teacher at San Diego State University (SDSU). After years of struggling with her weight, she decided to give exercise a try. A passion for health and fitness grew instantly and inspired her to become certified as a personal trainer with NFPT, and as a group fitness instructor with AFAA Group Fitness and Madd Dog Athletics® Spinning. Theresa believes that nutrition and fitness are not about aesthetics but ultimately about feeling healthy and empowered.